Autopsy On A Dog That Ate Big Bone (Photos)

Discussion in 'Pets and Animals' started by collegereap, Jun 12, 2016.

  1. collegereap

    collegereap Moderator
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    Desist From Giving Your Pets Big Bones And Kitchen Remnants

    Few days ago, I got a call early in the morning from a client who said he woke up to find his most-priced Samoyed-breed dog lying dead, with no known reason. He got so bittered that he pleaded that I come do a POST-MORTEM (Necropsy/Autopsy) on his dog, because he was suspecting his neighbours &/or his dog-keeper.

    I came around, asked a few questions, and discovered that the dog was most active before they went to bed. No evidence of poisoning neither on the nor in the kennel. So I commenced with the PM.

    I need a general examination on the carcass, before I opened up the carcass. The intestines were relatively empty, likewise stomach. I proceeded to the thoracic cavity, with thorough examination on the various structures. Fortunately, on palpating the oesophagus (at the junction of the diaphragm), I saw the unfortunate bone hooked there, with a puncture on the wall of the oesophagus. Alas!!! That answered it all

    Am a Veterinarian (Vet Doctor) by profession and I speak vehemently about giving your pets bones, especially when a small dog is given a bone bigger than it can take. Remnants also might contain little bones, toothpicks, sharp objects, etc. Always sort foods before serving.

    Below are images of the Post-Mortem (PM)

    BdfZNkQaV5ms49cGM6jdE1ZK_iEteiJ9.jpeg

    BdfZNkQaV5ms49cGM6jdE1ZK_iEteiJ9.jpeg

    BdfZNkQaV5ms49cGM6jdE1ZK_iEteiJ9.jpeg

    BdfZNkQaV5ms49cGM6jdE1ZK_iEteiJ9.jpeg
     
    #1 collegereap, Jun 12, 2016
    Lasted edited by : Apr 14, 2017
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